Minimum Wage Law: What it Means for Gales Creek

Salem – Today, Governor Kate Brown signed Senate Bill 1532 into law, stating “I’m proud to sign into law my top priority of the 2016 Legislative session – raising the minimum wage.” The bill, which will give Oregon the nation’s highest minimum wage by 2022, is tiered by the geographic location of an employer. What does this mean for the Gales Creek community? We’ve tried to demystify the bill and clearly lay out what the minimum wage is, when it will go into effect, and other details.

With two major exceptions, the new law sets the statewide minimum wage at $13.50 by 2022. Gales Creek, Glenwood, and Timber, as well as all of Tillamook County are in the portion of the state that will be affected by this.

The law does not immediately raise the minimum wage; instead, the wage will rise over a six-year period and then revert back to being tied to the inflation rate. Here are the scheduled increases:

  • From July 1, 2016, to June 30, 2017, $9.75.
  • From July 1, 2017, to June 30, 2018, $10.25.
  • From July 1, 2018, to June 30, 2019, $10.75.
  • From July 1, 2019, to June 30, 2020, $11.25.
  • From July 1, 2020, to June 30, 2021, $12.
  • From July 1, 2021, to June 30, 2022, $12.75.
  • From July 1, 2022, to June 30, 2023, $13.50.

There are two exceptions to the statewide minimum wage:  If the employer is located within the urban growth boundary of a metropolitan service district (more specifically, the Portland Metro Urban Growth Boundary),  there will be a higher minimum wage of $14.75.

If the employer is located within a non-urban county (Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umitilla, Union, Wallowa, or Wheeler county), there will be a lower minimum wage of $12.50.

If you’d like to read the full text of the new law, you can find it HERE.

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